Often Capricious

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zootedrapscallion:

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jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.
Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.
Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.
"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.
But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.
The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.
Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.
"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.
Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.
“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.
Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.
http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:
An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

All that wasted food. This is cruel.

#america’s ideal of ‘you can’t have something you need that there’s plenty of unless you’ve ~earned it~’ is so twisted#i stg

I remember in 5th or 6th grade I brought in donuts to share with my friends at lunch on my birthday, and a teacher/lunch monitor saw me giving out donuts. She came over I wasn’t allowed to share food, and told me I had to throw those donuts away and that was a detention. I asked why and she said “it’s a safety thing, some students have allergies so sharing food is against the school’s policy” and one of my friends asked “don’t you think that if we had food allergies, we would know?” The teacher then said “probably, but…” and proceeded to ask all of us if we had food allergies. When every one of us said no, she told me sharing food was still against the rules and I still had a detention. I’m pretty sure I started to cry, turning 11 and not wanting to throw away the 12 donuts my mom bought, and I said “but it’s my birthday…” I guess the teacher felt bad, so she made every one of us write our name and student ID down on a slip of paper. Then she went to the nurse and made her look up all of our student files so that she could make sure none of us had food allergies. She came back about 15 minutes later and finally said that we could eat the donuts (although admittedly, I & some of my friends had eaten ours already).
In 8th grade, my friend attempted suicide. A couple weeks after the incident, she was back in school. She wasn’t in a good place and she was fighting with her parents, so she went on a hunger strike. She didn’t eat anything at home, and her parents wouldn’t put money in her school lunch account. I didn’t have the same lunch bell as she did (I’d be in gym class while she ate lunch), so I skipped class to buy her food. The first time I asked my teacher to go to the nurse, then went to the cafeteria and bought my friend food, sat with her until her lunch bell was over, forged a pass and went back to class. The next day, though, I knew my teacher wouldn’t let me go to the nurse again, so I just didn’t go to class at all. I got caught when the teacher took attendance and I wasn’t there, so they called my name over the loudspeaker (yikes) and told me to go to the office. (Luckily this was after I had bought my friend lunch, and coincidentally it was also my birthday- hence I didn’t care that I got caught and I was a lot calmer than I normally would’ve been.) I explained everything to the principal, who didn’t care about the circumstances. She didn’t work to get my friend a free lunch, didn’t set up a counselor for her, just gave me detention. Luckily it was my first offense, so I only had a 2 hour detention after school.
anyways, the american school system can go fuck itself with a cactus


Ok, story time; I remember in my old school (a private school I went to for grades 3-7), administrators would come around to the different lunch rooms with a big cart filled with different foods depending on the day. After lunch was done there was always at least 1/4th of the food still left on the cart. (A little background info, during the time I went here I lived in an apartment with my single mother - who was still paying off her med. school debts - and my younger brother, so money was pretty tight and we couldn’t afford enough food to eat more than one meal a day) But anyways, I was always hungry and was never on the actual list to receive the food brought around, so I would try and ask for the left-overs to eat. But low and behold, it was always a stern no, and a slap on the wrist. So eventually I learned to get my friends to go back for seconds and then give that to me. This worked for a time until the teachers caught on and would literally grab the plate or bowl of food I was eating and throw it in the trash.Now imagine that you are a hungry 10yr old who just got his first full meal in several days, only to have it ripped out from under your nose and thrown down the trash. That’s some problematic (and rather traumatic) shit, /especially/ since the administrators and teachers had full knowledge of my family’s economic situation at the time./end story/

face-palms:

zootedrapscallion:

shodobear:

jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.

The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”

That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.

All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?

Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.

This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.

If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.

It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:

  • An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
  • Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
  • Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
  • A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
  • The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
  • Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
  • Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

All that wasted food. This is cruel.

I remember in 5th or 6th grade I brought in donuts to share with my friends at lunch on my birthday, and a teacher/lunch monitor saw me giving out donuts. She came over I wasn’t allowed to share food, and told me I had to throw those donuts away and that was a detention. I asked why and she said “it’s a safety thing, some students have allergies so sharing food is against the school’s policy” and one of my friends asked “don’t you think that if we had food allergies, we would know?” The teacher then said “probably, but…” and proceeded to ask all of us if we had food allergies. When every one of us said no, she told me sharing food was still against the rules and I still had a detention. I’m pretty sure I started to cry, turning 11 and not wanting to throw away the 12 donuts my mom bought, and I said “but it’s my birthday…” I guess the teacher felt bad, so she made every one of us write our name and student ID down on a slip of paper. Then she went to the nurse and made her look up all of our student files so that she could make sure none of us had food allergies. She came back about 15 minutes later and finally said that we could eat the donuts (although admittedly, I & some of my friends had eaten ours already).

In 8th grade, my friend attempted suicide. A couple weeks after the incident, she was back in school. She wasn’t in a good place and she was fighting with her parents, so she went on a hunger strike. She didn’t eat anything at home, and her parents wouldn’t put money in her school lunch account. I didn’t have the same lunch bell as she did (I’d be in gym class while she ate lunch), so I skipped class to buy her food. The first time I asked my teacher to go to the nurse, then went to the cafeteria and bought my friend food, sat with her until her lunch bell was over, forged a pass and went back to class. The next day, though, I knew my teacher wouldn’t let me go to the nurse again, so I just didn’t go to class at all. I got caught when the teacher took attendance and I wasn’t there, so they called my name over the loudspeaker (yikes) and told me to go to the office. (Luckily this was after I had bought my friend lunch, and coincidentally it was also my birthday- hence I didn’t care that I got caught and I was a lot calmer than I normally would’ve been.) I explained everything to the principal, who didn’t care about the circumstances. She didn’t work to get my friend a free lunch, didn’t set up a counselor for her, just gave me detention. Luckily it was my first offense, so I only had a 2 hour detention after school.

anyways, the american school system can go fuck itself with a cactus

Ok, story time; I remember in my old school (a private school I went to for grades 3-7), administrators would come around to the different lunch rooms with a big cart filled with different foods depending on the day. After lunch was done there was always at least 1/4th of the food still left on the cart. (A little background info, during the time I went here I lived in an apartment with my single mother - who was still paying off her med. school debts - and my younger brother, so money was pretty tight and we couldn’t afford enough food to eat more than one meal a day) But anyways, I was always hungry and was never on the actual list to receive the food brought around, so I would try and ask for the left-overs to eat. But low and behold, it was always a stern no, and a slap on the wrist. So eventually I learned to get my friends to go back for seconds and then give that to me. This worked for a time until the teachers caught on and would literally grab the plate or bowl of food I was eating and throw it in the trash.
Now imagine that you are a hungry 10yr old who just got his first full meal in several days, only to have it ripped out from under your nose and thrown down the trash. That’s some problematic (and rather traumatic) shit, /especially/ since the administrators and teachers had full knowledge of my family’s economic situation at the time.

/end story/

(Source: thinksquad, via wellbehavedwomen-dontmakehistory)

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thisisb-s:

houseofalexzander:

Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is a lie.
Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is just a phase.
Don’t tell me that Gender Fluid is childish.

I live and breath my gender fluidity. I proudly stand within the Gender Queers in support of a new, gender variant society.

Gender is the seed that has sprouted into the discriminatory, bigoted & bland society we live in. When you dig down deep into the issues surrounding the world right now it all comes back to one tiny little fuck up. The idea that biological sex somehow determines the gender roll of individuals is a lie. In fact, gender rolls is a lie. Just because I identify as gender fluid does not mean that I must uphold any societal expectation, associated with gender fluidity.

Plain and simple, I plan on having two children.
I will not teach my little boy to “be a man.”
I will not teach my little girl what it means to “be a woman.”
Instead, i’ll teach my children to just simply be good people.
Because a society full of good people makes for a better life than a society full of classified, judgmental, opinionated and shallow people.

Thank you,
Elliott Alexzander

This message brought to you by House of Alexzander

YOU ARE EVERYTHING I HOPE TO BE IN LIFE
ALSO YOU ARE ROCKING THOSE OUTFITS

i want those clothes

So freaking beautiful. Omg. ♡

unfff

Absolutely wonderful.

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So yeah I can see how many fingers you’re holding up

THIS IS VERY ACCURATE

THIS IS VERY BEAUTIFUL

Is this accurate? Is this what it’s actually like to not be able to see clearly?

yes

I love this!!

(Source: fullheartedly, via missinterpretations)

selfdepricatingsmirk:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police in riot gear take the front line in front of the Ferguson Police Department.

Saturday, October 11th

they got a sniper
what the fuck
it’s a crowd of people not fucking moving the fuck you need a sniper for
might as well just mount a fucking machine gun bay if you’re planning on taking out people who are STANDING STILL THEY ARE SITTING ASS TARGETS YOU DO NOT NEED A MOTHERFUCKING SNIPER AT A PEACEFUL PROTEST

(via redasatomato)

panicrobot:

This man was our president for EIGHT YEARS. We are never gonna live this down

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nauticalprincex:

i can’t wait until i can afford my taste in clothes

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Here’s an exclusive clip of The Legend of Korra book 4 from IGN in 1080p.

is that handsome jack

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